...for the Week of September 6, 1999

Monday

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Review Venn Diagram & Ancient Egyptian Religion - Assign Hymn to Ra
Tuesday WB00684_.gif (1100 bytes) QUIZ over 2.1
Wednesday WB00684_.gif (1100 bytes) The Pyramids - Hymn to Ra art DUE
Thursday WB00684_.gif (1100 bytes) The Pyramids - The Orion Mystery - Read 2.2
Friday WB00684_.gif (1100 bytes) Begin The Fertile Crescent - Assign "What is in your tomb?"

...for the Week of August 30, 1999

Monday

WB00684_.gif (1100 bytes)

Review Venn Diagram & Ancient Egyptian Religion - Assign Hymn to Ra
Tuesday WB00684_.gif (1100 bytes) QUIZ over 2.1
Wednesday WB00684_.gif (1100 bytes) The Pyramids - Hymn to Ra art DUE
Thursday WB00684_.gif (1100 bytes) The Pyramids - The Orion Mystery - Read 2.2
Friday WB00684_.gif (1100 bytes) Begin The Fertile Crescent - Assign "What is in your tomb?"

...for the Week of August 23, 1999

Wednesday WB00684_.gif (1100 bytes) First Day of Classes
Thursday WB00684_.gif (1100 bytes) History and Progress - Drawing Analysis DUE
Friday WB00684_.gif (1100 bytes) The Geography of Ancient Egypt - Read 2.1 - Complete Venn Diagram

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    Clinging to a thread of life that both preserved and protected,  the Ancient Egyptians built their enduring world from the geography that surrounded it.  The nourishing Nile and the unforgiving deserts of northeastern Africa cradled this early civilization.  With these gifts of nature, the Egyptians built a prosperous empire that went virtually unchanged for nearly 4,000 years, from the Great Pyramids at Giza to the boy-king Tuthankhamen.  To understand Egypt, understand its geography.  From the land and water around them, the Egyptians found answers and solutions to life's most basic questions, ranging from "What's for dinner," to "Where do I go when I die?"  When a 19th-century archeological dig produced a stone that allowed historians to translate hieroglyphic writing, the Ancient Egyptians came to life, everything from their political structure to their ways of war.  Though countless others walked the earth before the Egyptians, none left us such a legacy of who they were, what they believed and how they did things.  If we were to write a book about how we became the people we are today, Ancient Egypt would be Chapter One.

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Hymn to Ra - an an ancient prayer to the sun god

How to Mummify a Pharoah - A do-it-yourself guide

The Myth of Osiris - a foundation for life in Ancient Egypt

The Egyptian Gods - A guide

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Narmer.gif (11200 bytes) rosetta stone.gif (5989 bytes)
rt_arrow.jpg (780 bytes) Understand the geography of northeastern Africa, and you understand the foundation upon which the Ancient Egyptians constructed their world.  The Nile River gave the Egyptians everything they wanted; from as simple as a water supply to the more complex idea of life after death.   Flowing northward from the high central plains, the river flooded annually (the inundation) breathing life in an otherwise inhospitable corner of the world.  Two deserts and the Red Sea protected their world, while the Nile provided for it. rt_arrow.jpg (780 bytes)  Egypt was unified under King Narmer, shown in the center of the palette above.  Narmer, wearing a crown similar to a bowling pin, united Upper and Lower Egypt into one kingdom, setting into cycle the Old Kingdom, a theocratic form of government and the dynastic ruling structure that lasted nearly three millenniums rt_arrow.jpg (780 bytes) Our significant knowledge of Egypt can be traced to the Rosetta Stone, a translation of hieroglyphs left by the Egyptians themselves.  This one tablet, opened the door to a near-eternity of Egyptian life
Osiris.jpg (14094 bytes) saqqara.jpg (12801 bytes) Pyramids.jpg (14817 bytes)
rt_arrow.jpg (780 bytes)  The life of an Egyptian, however, revolved around Osiris and the underworld over which he presided.  The Myth of Osiris dominated Egyptian thought. rt_arrow.jpg (780 bytes) Egypt was a theocracy - a society in which the political leader also was believed to have divine qualities.  At left, the step-pyramid a Saqquara, believed by many to be the first attempt at stacking burial chambers called mastabas.  These highly-regarded (and often robbed) burial chambers served as weigh stations for the mummified body, to be visited occasionally by the Ka. rt_arrow.jpg (780 bytes) The importance of the passage from life to death, especially for Egyptian royalty, is demonstrated by the Great Pyramids at Giza.  Built during the Old Kingdom, their size, scope and purpose is unprecedented in the Ancient world.
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rt_arrow.jpg (780 bytes) The Ka was like a soul, or spirit double that frequented the resting place of the physical body.  It was important that the Ka be able to recognize the correct body so that ma'at could be maintained. rt_arrow.jpg (780 bytes) The most powerful of pharaohs was Ramses II, shown above with Egyptian enemies is his grasp.  Ramses II lived 92 years, fathering 52 sons, endearing him as a god to his people. rt_arrow.jpg (780 bytes) The most famous pharaoh was Tuthankhamen, a boy-king who died before he was 25. His list of accomplishments was short and shallow, but the discovery of his relatively untouched tomb shed a great deal of light on Egyptian history.

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Chapter 2.1
rt_arrow.jpg (780 bytes) Egypt - Gift of the Nile...WHY?  What gifts did nature give to the Egyptians?
rt_arrow.jpg (780 bytes) What were the primary characteristics of each of the three kingdoms of Egypt?
rt_arrow.jpg (780 bytes) Everyday life in Egypt revolved around their religion and social structure.  Be able to describe it.

 

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